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Founder: A pacifist

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Least Corrupt Governments: 335th Most Cheerful Citizens: 484th Most Compassionate Citizens: 575th+19
Most Pacifist: 579th Nicest Citizens: 579th Most Cultured: 1,016th Largest Publishing Industry: 1,036th Best Weather: 1,038th Most Rebellious Youth: 1,256th Most Inclusive: 1,281st Most Beautiful Environments: 1,380th Most Devout: 1,556th Smartest Citizens: 1,678th Safest: 1,697th Healthiest Citizens: 1,821st Largest Welfare Programs: 2,041st Lowest Crime Rates: 2,136th Highest Food Quality: 2,168th Most Eco-Friendly Governments: 2,195th Most Popular Tourist Destinations: 2,266th Highest Foreign Aid Spending: 2,435th Most Advanced Public Education: 2,558th
World Factbook Entry

---->---->---->---->---->---->Welcome to Peace
This place is a safe haven for nations seeking peaceful sanctuary from the basketcases of the world. (Some might say this is a rather quiet region.)

"Killing for peace is like whoring for virginity."

Some Bill Watterson's philosophy:
Hobbes: "Why do we play war, and never peace?"
Calvin: "Not enough role models."

Invaders need not apply for an alliance with Peace.


Tags: Featured, Founderless, Minuscule, and Password.

Peace contains 4 nations.

Today's World Census Report

The Lowest Overall Tax Burden in Peace

World Census financial experts assessed nations across a range of direct and indirect measures in order to determine which placed the lowest tax burden on their citizens.

As a region, Peace is ranked 24,715th in the world for Lowest Overall Tax Burden.

1.The Republic of New BabutchaloopirsLeft-Leaning College State“Pride and Industry”
2.The Brothers Lionheart of NangijalaLiberal Democratic Socialists“Lägereldarnas och sagornas tid”
3.The Most Serene Republic of PirouettesLiberal Democratic Socialists“Paiana hymnoumen heilissousai kallichoroi”
4.The Peaceable Kingdom of Lions and LambsLeft-wing Utopia“The lion will eat straw like the ox”

Regional Happenings

  • : The Republic of Fica Abs of the region United States of Euphemia li Brittania proposed constructing embassies.
  • : La paix ceased to exist.
  • : The lane ceased to exist.
  • : Cerro azul ceased to exist.
  • : Trees and heroes ceased to exist.
  • : The whimsical oracle ceased to exist.
  • : Castle in the sky ceased to exist.
  • : Ronja ceased to exist.
  • : Playa ceased to exist.
  • : The United States of New Michael Federation Republic of the region The world peace coalition proposed constructing embassies.

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Peace Regional Message Board

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The Peaceable Kingdom of Lions and Lambs

“One man practicing kindness in the wilderness is worth all the temples this world pulls.”
― Jack Kerouac, "The Dharma Bums"

The Brothers Lionheart of Nangijala

Lions and Lambs wrote:“One man practicing kindness in the wilderness is worth all the temples this world pulls.”
― Jack Kerouac, "The Dharma Bums"

That's a beautiful quote.

Yes, cultivating inner qualities is preferable to constructing physical monuments.

Never read anything by Kerouac. Have you? Amusingly, I remember an occasion when someone recommended Kerouac to me; but that individual was so obnoxious that it backfired.

The Peaceable Kingdom of Lions and Lambs

Nangijala wrote:Amusingly, I remember an occasion when someone recommended Kerouac to me; but that individual was so obnoxious that it backfired.

Yes, he is one of those artists whose fans unfortunately can be rather off-putting, at times. He has a reputation for being "cool," he writes about drinking and drug use and sex and rebelliousness, so he is attractive to some in those regards, I think. But his writing is tragic. He writes about extremely flawed individuals, from the point of view of someone with absolute empathy. He is incredibly honest in his books, all of them are autobiographical, and he holds nothing back, really grasping desperately to understand the human condition and the truth about people -- both in general, struggling with humanity, but also with the person standing right in front of him.

I've read a lot of his books. I found them quite beautiful and moving. However, that was over a decade ago...and sometimes I worry they're books that might speak best to younger men, so I haven't revisited them. I do hope they hold up, though.

His best-known work is "On the Road," where he crisscrosses the US on multiple road trips with a manic friend, encountering various counterculture icons as they run away from their problems.

The book I quoted above, "The Dharma Bums," is about a summer he spent working alone as a fire lookout in a national forest, exploring Buddhism and a life spent in solitary introspection, as well as his times with the poet and environmentalist Gary Snyder.

I also recommend "Visions of Gerard," somewhat different from his other books, as it's about his childhood, growing up in a French Canadian family, and especially about his brother, Gerard, who sadly died quite young. This book is so very beautiful and sad. I daresay it is unlikely to be read without tears. He really cuts right to the heart of what it's like to be a human being in this world.

The Brothers Lionheart of Nangijala

Hiya Tel fyr mora, would be happy to see you back in Peace. I've telegrammed you the regional password. If my telegram was pushed out by a slew of recruitment telegrams and disappeared, let me know and I'll send it again.

Thank you very much for the extensive notes on Kerouac's works, Lions and Lambs! Your perspective makes it appear much more humane and relatable. Maybe I'll try it some day. (Heh, yes, the fan I once encountered was unfortunately off-putting; conceited and arrogant.)

I actually have the impression that one of the things good novels can do for us, if we let them, is teach us something about relating to someone's death. Even before we experience someone close to us dying. Death is one of the themes in The Brothers Lionheart, a children's novel. Even though it's inside a fantasy framework, emotionally it is like in our world. Lindgren also introduced death of a beloved character towards the end of Ronja the Robber's Daughter. It's not the central theme there, but it's part of the young main characters' growing up. In the Harry Potter series I thought that it was one of the good qualities of the storytelling that the author was not afraid of building characters that the readers grow fond of, who in the course of the story have to die. (Less courageous writers prefer to kill off characters whom readers don't relate to much.)

The Peaceable Kingdom of Lions and Lambs

Nangijala wrote:I actually have the impression that one of the things good novels can do for us, if we let them, is teach us something about relating to someone's death.

That's well put. And I think I agree with you. That tracks with my own experience.

Two of the most impactful and memorable scenes from books that I read in my childhood involved the deaths of dogs. Where the Red Fern Grows and Island of the Blue Dolphins. They may have been animals, rather than humans, but reading about them struck me to the core.

The Most Serene Republic of Pirouettes

Dear all - I usually try to tip the balance here in favor of compassion during the Z-Day events, but it looks like it may not be enough to move the needle this year. I'll be back in about 24 hours.

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Also, what a refreshingly lovely conversation about literature. I wonder what it is about thinking or reading about the death of a beloved animal that makes it so poignant. (The greater knowledge of the people who care for it about what is happening, combined with an inability to change the outcome?) Perhaps it's because we put our guard up when it's a person; we expect the impact and brace for it. But telling the story about the death of an animal disarms us, makes it easier to see the simple profundity of the loss.

The Peaceable Kingdom of Lions and Lambs

Pirouettes wrote:Dear all - I usually try to tip the balance here in favor of compassion during the Z-Day events, but it looks like it may not be enough to move the needle this year. I'll be back in about 24 hours.

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Also, what a refreshingly lovely conversation about literature. I wonder what it is about thinking or reading about the death of a beloved animal that makes it so poignant. (The greater knowledge of the people who care for it about what is happening, combined with an inability to change the outcome?) Perhaps it's because we put our guard up when it's a person; we expect the impact and brace for it. But telling the story about the death of an animal disarms us, makes it easier to see the simple profundity of the loss.

Thanks for trying to cure folks on Z-Day. I didn't think there would be anyone around.

As to stories involving the deaths of animals, I think the points you've brought up are good ones. Certainly the knowledge of the humans, combined with the animal's inability to comprehend the cause of its suffering, is a major reason and one that really gets me.

Most of my personal experience with animals involves dogs. The way that they show unconditional love and devotion and implicit trust is unlike anything else I've known, outside of infants. Not being able to communicate why they may be suffering or even dying is heartbreaking, and makes you feel helpless. Especially when they turn to you during such extreme moments.

That, combined with their inherent innocence, makes it feel tragic. Again, the only other related feeling I've found is in the innocence of a small baby.

The Brothers Lionheart of Nangijala

I've put up some cherry blossoms at the top of the page. Hope you like them.

The Peaceable Kingdom of Lions and Lambs

I love them. Nice choice.

The Peaceable Kingdom of Lions and Lambs

Erik Satie - Gymnopédies
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wnacdOIoTBQ

It brings me a kind of peace, even if that peace is tinged with melancholy.

Nangijala and Playa

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