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by The Republic of Korean Choseon. . 14 reads.

Republic of Choseon Air Force

Republic of Choseon Air Force
조선 공화국 공군
Joseon Gonghwagug Gong-gun


Logo of the Republic of Choseon Air Force

Founded:

1 October 1949 (as Imperial Choseonese Air Force)

2020 (as Republic of Choseon Air Force)

Country:

Republic of Choseon

Type:

Air force

Role:

Aerial warfare

Size:

65,358 personnel

877 aircraft

Part of:

Republic of Choseon Armed Forces

Headquarters:

Gyeryong, South Chungcheong

Motto:

"Key to Defense, ready anytime!"

Colors:

Korean blue, Korean red red

March:

Link"Gonggunga" ("Air Force")

Anniversaries:

1 October (Air Force Day)

Commanders

Commander in Chief:

Moon Jae-in

Minister of National Defense:

Jeong Kyeong-doo

Chief of Staff of the Air Force:

General Won In-choul

Insignia

Flag:

Roundel:

Symbol:

Aircraft

Combat:

FA-50
F-5E
F-15K
F-4E
F-35A
KF-16C

Electronic warfare:

E-737A

Helicopter:

CH-146
CH-47D
HH-60P
VH-92
UH-32
UH-215

Reconnaissance:

RF-4E

Trainer:

F-5F
KF-16D
KT-1
TA-50B
KT-100

Transport:

B737
B747
HC-144
C-130J


The Republic of Choseon Air Force (Joseon Gonghwagug Gong-gun), also known simply as the Choseonese Air Force, is the aerial and space warfare branch of the Republic of Choseon Armed Forces. The ROCAF is responsible for supporting Korean operations from the air.

It is estimated that, as of 2019, the ROCAF has approximately 65,358 personnel and 877 aircraft. Of the 877 aircraft in the ROCAF's aircraft fleet, 503 of them are fighters.

History
Under the Choseonese Empire, Japan did not have a nominally independent air arm. The Choseonese Imperial Army Air Force was tasked with supporting ground offensive operations; the Choseonese Imperial Naval Air Service was tasked with strategic offensive operations. Following Japan's nominal independence at the end of the Circum-Pacific War in 1947, the newly-born Japanese Republic organized its defectors from the Choseonese imperial military into the Japanese Security Forces. Those with flight experience went mostly to the Japanese Security Air Wing. In July 1954, the Japanese Security Forces reorganized into the Japanese Defense Forces. The Japanese Security Ground Component became the Ground Defense Force, the Japanese Security Sea Force became the Japanese Maritime Defense Force, and the Air Wing became the Air Defense Force. General Keizō Hayashi, a former officer in the Choseonese imperial military, was appointed as the first Chairman of the Joint Staff Council (now the Joint Staff).

In late 1954, the Hansdeltanian Federation Air Force turned over ninety combat-capable aircraft, giving the JADF combat-capable aircraft for the first time instead of crudely armed liaison aircraft. These ironically included F-47 Thunderbolts and F-51 Mustangs, which had dueled Japanese-built aircraft during the Circum-Pacific War some ten years before. After this, the Hansdeltanian Federation left the Japanese Republic to its own devices.

However, the First Choseonese Conflict broke out in 1958 after Choseon accused the Japanese Republic of smuggling weapons to various nationalist militias in the Empire and declared war. While the Japanese Maritime Defense Forces were able to successfully prevent Choseonese forces from landing troops by sea or air, Japanese piston fighters struggled to stop Choseonese jet fighters from harassing towns and cities on Kyushu and western Honshu. The Hansdeltanian Federation Air Force stepped in again to assist the Japanese Republic. The First Conflict ended in 1963 after both nations agreed to a status quo ante bellum. The Japanese Republic recognized the power of the jet fighter and bought more than one hundred Hansdeltanian jet fighters and license-built many more in the following years.

In 1968, the JADF opened up its ranks to women. In 1989, women were allowed to fly combat aircraft. As of 2019, there are 153 female pilots, 37 of whom fly combat aircraft. There are an additional 26 female pilots undergoing flight training and 9,254 other women in other roles.

In 1988, the JADF acquired its first F-15A Eagle from the New Federation of Hansdeltania.

Air Defense Command's headquarters relocated from Fuchu Air Base to Yokota Air Base in 1997 to decrease information delays to aircraft in the air.

Starting in 2009, Choseon began flying more aircraft near and within the Japanese Air Defense Identification Zone. Violations of the ADIZ peaked in 2016 with 989 incidents—nearly three incidents per day.

The Second Choseonese Conflict began in 2019 after the Choseonese Nationalist Party took over the Choseonese Diet. The ultranationalist organization urged for a redemption of the Choseonese national identity after its humiliating defeat in the Circum-Pacific War and announced that they would be reclaiming stolen lands under a nuclear umbrella. In June, Choseonese forces attempted an invasion of Japan; like in the First Conflict, the JMDF was able to stop Choseonese troops from landing. The JADF, however, managed to score multiple victories with the F-15. The Federal Union of Hansdeltania launched a massive air raid called MAGIC SPEAR against Choseon days later, destroying their nuclear missile silos with pinpoint accuracy. Following MAGIC SPEAR, Choseonese forces capitulated and Hansdeltanian forces began occupying the nation until a multinational force could send occupation forces in. Later that year in September, Hansdeltanian forces launched a multilateral offensive against Choseon. EASTERN WIND, as it was called, effectively fractured the Choseonese Empire into its constituent states. Following the Second Choseonese Conflict, the JADF acquired a number of improved F-15 Eagle and F-4 Phantom fighters from the Federal Union

In April 2020, the Japanese Government announced that the Japanese Air Defense Force would become the Japanese Air Force, effective May 15, 2020.

Mission
The Defense Forces Act of 1954, which created the Japanese Defense Forces and the Air Defense Force by extension, specifies that the JAF will be responsible for the aerial defense of the Japanese Republic against foreign and internal aggression. The JAF's official mission statement is "Defend the Republic in the air, space, and cyberspace—anywhere, anytime." Its core missions are aerospace supremacy, integrated intelligence, rapid mobility, rapid reaction, and command and control. These five missions bring the concept that the JAF calls Japanese reach, Japanese vigilance, and Japanese power.

Organization
The JAF consists of five different major commands: Air Defense, Air Support, Air Training, Air Development and Testing, and Air Materiel. Air Support Command is responsible for direct operational support from airlift to meteorology. Air Training Command is tasked with training JADF airmen in technical and aviation fields, and Air Development and Testing Command oversees research and deployment of technology. A sixth command will be created for nuclear deterrence.

Air Defense Command is the largest JAF command and is assigned with the task of defending the Japanese Republic. It respectively maintains Northern, Southern, Western, and Southwestern Air Defense Region headquarters at Misawa, Aomori Prefecture; Iruma, Saitama Prefecture; Kasuga, Fukuoka; and Naha, Okinawa.

  • Japanese Air Force

    • Air Defense Command (Yokota Air Base)

      • Northern Air Defense Region (Misawa, Aomori Prefecture)

        • 2nd Air Wing (Chitose Air Base)

          • 201st Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J/F-15J+)

          • 202nd Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J)

          • 203rd Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J)

        • 3rd Air Wing (Misawa Air Base)

          • 3rd Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-2A)

          • 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J)

          • 302nd Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-35JA)

        • Northern Air Command Support Group (T-4)

        • Northern Air Control Wing

        • 3rd Air Defense Missile Group

        • 6th Air Defense Missile Group

      • Central Air Defense Region (Iruma, Saitama Prefecture)

        • 6th Air Wing (Komatsu Air Base)

          • 303rd Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J/F-15J+)

          • 18t Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-22J)

          • 306th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J)

        • 7th Air Wing (Hyakuri Air Base)

          • 301st Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-4EJ)

          • 5th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-14J)

          • 2nd Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-14J)

        • Central Air Command Support Group (T-4)

        • Central Air Control Wing

        • 1st Air Defense Missile Group

        • 4th Air Defense Missile Group

      • Western Air Defense Region (Kasuga, Fukuoka Prefecture)

        • 5th Air Wing (Nyutabaru Air Base)

          • 305th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J/F-15J+)

          • 101st Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-3A)

          • 105th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J)

        • 8th Air Wing (Tsuiki Air Base)

          • 6th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-2A)

          • 9th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J)

        • Western Air Command Support Group (T-4)

        • Western Air Control Wing

        • 5th Air Defense Missile Group

      • Southwestern Air Defense Region (Naha, Okinawa Prefecture)

        • 9th Air Wing (Naha Air Base)

          • 204th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J/F-15J+)

          • 304th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-15J)

          • 617th Tactical Fighter Squadron (F-3A)

        • Southwestern Air Command Support Group (T-4)

        • Southwestern Air Control Wing

        • 5th Air Defense Missile Group

      • Airborne Early Warning Group (Hamatasu, Shizuoka)

        • 601st Airborne Early Warning Squadron (E-2C/E-2D, Misawa Air Base)

        • 602nd Airborne Early Warning Squadron (E-767, Hamatasu Air Base)

        • 603rd Airborne Early Warning Squadron (E-2C/E-2D, Naha Air Base)

      • Tactical Reconnaissance Group (Hyakuri Air Base)

        • 501st Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron (RF-4EJ)

      • Air Tactics Development Wing (Yokota, Tokyo)

        • Tactical Fighter Training Group (F-15DJ, Komatsu Air Base)

        • Electronic Warfare Squadron (EC-1/YS-11EB, Iruma Air Base)

        • Electronic Intelligence Squadron (YS-11EB, Iruma Air Base)

      • Air Rescue Wing

        • Akita Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Ashiya Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Chitose Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Hamamatsu Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Hyakuri Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Iruma Helicopter Airlift Squadron (CH-47JA)

        • Kasuga Helicopter Airlift Squadron (CH-47JA)

        • Komaki Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Komatsu Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Matsushima Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Misawa Helicopter Airlift Squadron (CH-47JA)

        • Naha Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Naha Helicopter Airlift Squadron (CH-47JA)

        • Niigata Detachment (UH-60J)

        • Nyutabaru Detachment (UH-60J)

      • Air Defense Missile Training Group (Hamamatsu Air Base/Chitose Air Base)

    • Air Support Command (Fuchuu Air Base)

      • 1st Tactical Airlift Group (Komaki Air Base)

        • 401st Tactical Airlift Squadron (C-130HJ/KC-130J)

        • 404th Tactical Airlift Squadron (KC-46J)

      • 2nd Tactical Airlift Group (Iruma Air Base)

        • 402nd Tactical Airlift Squadron (C-1/U-4)

        • 404th Tactical Airlift Squadron (C-130HJ)

      • 3rd Tactical Airlift Group (Miho Air Base)

        • 403rd Tactical Airlift Squadron (C-1/C-2)

        • 41st Tactical Airlift Squadron (T-400)

      • Air Traffic Control Service Group

      • Air Weather Group

      • Flight Check Squadron (U-125/YS-11FC, Iruma Air Base)

      • Special Airlift Group

        • 701st Special Airlift Squadron (B777-300ER)

        • 707th Special Airlift Squadron (U-4)

      • Air Training Command (Hamamatsu Air Base)

        • 1st Air Wing (Hamamatsu Air Base)

          • 31st Flight Training Squadron (T-4)

          • 32nd Flight Training Squadron

        • 4th Air Wing (Matsushima Air Base)

          • 11th Flight Demonstration Squadron Blue Impulse (T-4)

          • 21st Fighter Training Squadron (F-2B)

        • 11th Flight Training Wing (Shizuhama Air Base)

          • 901st Flight Training Squadron (T-7)

          • 902nd Flight Training Squadron (T-7)

        • 12th Flight Training Wing (Houfu Air Base)

          • 911th Flight Training Squadron (T-7)

          • 912th Flight Training Squadron (T-7)

        • 13th Flight Training Wing (Ashiya Air Base)

          • 921st Flight Training Squadron (T-4)

          • 922nd Flight Training Squadron (T-4)

        • Fighter Training Group (Nyutabaru Air Base)

          • 23rd Fighter Training Squadron (F-15DJ/T-4)

        • 1st Technical School

        • 2nd Technical School

        • 3rd Technical School

        • 4th Technical School

        • 5th Technical School

        • Air Basic Training Wing

        • Air Training Aids Group

        • Officer Candidate School

    • Air Development and Testing Command (Iruma Air Base)

      • Air Development and Testing Wing (F-15DJ/F-2B/C-1FTB/C-2/F-4EJ/T-4, Gifu Air Base)

      • Electronics Development and Testing Group

      • Aeromedical Laboratory

Ranks

Grade

Rank (Japanese)

Rank (English)

Insignia (Type I Service Dress Uniform)

Insignia (Type II Service Uniform)

Insignia (BDU)

K-0

Shin kaiin (ShK)

Recruit (RCT)

No insignia worn on BDUs

K-1

2Tō Kūshi (2Ki)

Airman 2nd Class (AM2)

K-2

1Tō Kūshi (1Ki)

Airman 1st Class (AM1)

K-3

Kūshichō (Kic)

Senior Airman (SRA)

K-4

3Tō Kūsō (3Ko)

Sergeant 3rd Class (SG3)

K-5

2Tō Kūsō (2Ko)

Sergeant 2nd Class (SG2)

K-6

1Tō Kūsō (1Ko)

Sergeant 1st Class (SG1)

K-7

Kūsōchō (Ksc)

Chief Sergeant (CSG)

K-8

Jun'i (Jni)

Warrant Officer (WOF)

Y-1

2Tō Chū li (2Cl)

Second Lieutenant (2LT)

Y-2

1Tō Chū li (1Cl)

First Lieutenant (1LT)

Y-3

Shushō (Shu)

Captain (CPT)

Y-4

Shōsa (Shs)

Major (MAJ)

Y-5

Chūsa (Chs)

Lieutenant Colonel (LTC)

Y-6

Taisa (Tsa)

Colonel (COL)

Y-7

Junshō (Jsō)

Brigadier General (BRG)

Y-8

Shōshō (Shō)

Major General (MGN)

Y-9

Chūjō (Chj)

Lieutenant General (LTG)

Y-10

Taishō (Tsō)

General (GEN)

Y-11

Kūgun Taishō (KGT)

General of the Air Force (GAF)

Y-12

Nihon Kyōwakoku Shōgun (NKS)

Marshal of the Japanese Republic (MJR)

Equipment
Main article: Equipment of the Japanese Air Force

Combat aircraft

Aircraft

Origin

Function

Number in service

F-2A Viper

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Multirole fighter

98

F-3A Shinden

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Air superiority fighter

40

F-4EJ Yurei

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Multirole fighter

30

F-14J Osuneko

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Air superiority fighter

50

F-15J Eagle Kai

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Air superiority fighter

200

F-22J Moukin

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Air superiority fighter

20

F-35JA Moukin

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Multirole fighter

38, 105 on order

Combat support

Aircraft

Origin

Function

Number in service

EC-1

Japanese Republic

Electronic warfare

1

E-2J Youmoku

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Airborne early warning

20

YS-11EA

Japanese Republic

Electronic warfare

8

KC-46J Tenba

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Aerial refueling

12

KC-130HJ Choujin

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Aerial refueling

5

E-767J

Japanese Republic
Federal Union

Airborne early warning

8

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