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by The Republic of Grootfries Rijk. . 40 reads.

Frisian Freedom >> Military


Frisian Army

Frisian Army
Fryske Lânmacht

Banner of the Frisian Army

Active

11 April 1526

Country

Frisia

Role

Land Warfare
Mercenary service

Size

46,000
300 guns

Headquarters

Ljouwert, Frisia

Engagements

Great Peasant War (1526-1541)
War of Oldenburgian Succession (1541-1544)
Fifth Saxon-Thuringian War (1543-1548)
Third Livonian War (1544-1545)
Fourth Livonian War (1551-1555)
Ligurian War (1553-1559)
Second Narrow Sea War (1554-1555)
Austro-Croatian War (1554-1556)
Turkish-Bosnian War (1557-1563)
Franco-Spanish War (1554-1562)
First Ligurian War (1566-1573)
War of the League of Fulda (1572-1578)
War of Bohemian Succession (1577-1581)
Second Austro-Hungarian War (1878-1583)
War of Savoyard Succession (1583-1588)
Rigan War of Independence (1584-1585)
Great Hanseatic War (1586-1591)
Great Livonian War (1589-1592)
Eighth Danish-Swedish War (1590-1597)
War of Prussian Independence (1598-Present)



Commander-in-Chief

Potestaat Klaes Auwerk

Deputy Commander

Marshal Jan Wülm Widema

The Frisian Army (Frisian: Fryske Lânmacht) is the land forces element of the military of Frisia. Its origins date back to 1526 when Pitter Widema, the first Bishop of Ljouwert raised the Army of Ljouwert to topple the church that symbolized Roman and feudal rule over Frisia. It quickly became the backbone of the army and as the Frisian state centralized to better fight against the Spanish yoke, it turned into a standing army. It is one of the first of its kind in Europe. It has served in the Great Peasant War, War of the League of Fulda and a number of wars in Europe as a mercenary war force leased by various states since its creation. Since 1580, it has slowly increased its numbers in the colonial regions, in particular the Garrison in West Indies which is 3,000 men strong.

The Frisian Army is tasked to defend the territory of Frisia and the life, property, security and interests of the Frisian People. The supreme authority over the Frisian Army, like the other two branches of the Frisian military, is exercised by the Potestaat, currently Klaes Auwerk.

History

Origins and Early History

The modern Frisian Army finds its origin in the Army of the Faithful (leger fan 'e leauwigen), a popular-raised levy of 2,500 that was raised by Pitter Widema, the Frisian reformer responsible for the separation of the Frisian and Roman Catholic Churches and the first Bishop of Ljouwert. Widema's Army of the Faithful was an untrained popular levy, but its zealotry and morale worked to devastating effect. After the Battle of the Great Jacobin Church, it was raised to 3,000 and then reorganized into three regiments of 1,000 and fully integrated into the Army of Ljouwert (later Army of Middle Frisia). The three regiments still bear 'Ljouwert's Most Faithful Regiment' (Frisian: Trou Rezjimint fan Ljouwert) as their unit name.

By the end of the Great Peasant War, the Frisian Land Force had rose from a small army of 5,000 to a force three times that size. At that time, the army had a simpler organization, with each regiment recruited from one of the seven military districts. These regiments spent the majority of their time in their own districts, with the three Faithful Regiments serving primarily as a mercenary force.

Between 1541 and 1573, the Frisian Army participated in nine distinct military conflicts in the Lower Saxony, Upper Saxony, the Baltics, Italy, the Balkans, Iberia and North Africa. Regiments of the Frisian Army served in mercenary capacity for those countries that would accept to lease them, and at that time the money received from mercenary action of the Frisian Army made up to 16% of the total state income. Considerably better trained and with higher regimental maneuverability than its levy-based counterparts, the Frisian Free Regiments were considered an elite force and in high demand by many European countries.

War of the League of Fulda

While a mercenary force with high merit and value, the Frisian army was still small. Its forts few and undermanned and its navy given much more importance. In reality, at that time even the small 2,000 man-strong marines were of higher value to the Frisian administration. This changed with the War of the League of Fulda. Immediately, the army was forced to change. While the soldiers were all highly trained, well-disciplined and well drilled, they were few and the quantity of the French armies quite simply meant that the highly trained Frisians were not as quickly reinforced as the French, and though they suffered less casualty in the average battle, each soldier lost was a bigger loss for the Frisian military. By the middle of the war, Frisia had been forced to temporarily forgo its reliance on quality to increase its size to more than 3 times its original size at the expense of skill. At the height of the war, Frisian armies was made of 90 regiments (90,000) which was still less than a third of the French forces active in the field. Major engagements of the Frisian army in the War of the League of Fulda include the Battle of Gorinchem, Siege of Utrecht, Battle of Holland and the Battle of the Fields.

After the war, Frisian army was decreased noticeably in size once again. Sixty of the ninety regiments active in the war were disbanded and the remnants divided into four armies. The bulk of these forces became the Army of Utrecht which, once the newly-acquired territories had been pacified, became the primary mercenary force in the Frisian Army.

Current Engagements

As of now, Frisia is not at war. This does not mean that the army is not participating in any engagements. The Hanseatic Garrison has been expanded by one infantry regiment active in the recently-occupied isle of Rugen as the marines responsible for its capture clear the island and return to their headquarters in Ljouwert. In addition, the Army of Utrecht, which was active in Scandinavia as a mercenary host fighting on the side of the Danes in the Eighth Danish-Swedish War until late 1597, is currently fighting for the Prussians against the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

Organization

The Frisian Land force is divided into four Armies (leger) and three Garrisons (garinzoen) made of a total of 46 regiments recruited out of the provinces of Frisia. While the four armies are much more structured in formation and established in the region they belong to. They are regularly drilled and in active service and often serve as mercenaries in various conflicts in Europe while the three garrisons are smaller in size and nowhere as structure. Garrisons are in reality the collective garrison of forts and military depots, camps and bases scattered in a military region. The West Indies garrison for example is scattered in the fortresses under Frisian forces and the military camps located near larger settlements. A rudimentary formation of Frisia's armies can be found below.

  • Army of Middle Frisia (Leger fan Midden-Fryslân)

      This army is the oldest and largest army in Frisia. It is 16,000 man strong, made of 15 regiments and its headquarters is Fort Sibets near Ljouwert. Its formation is 10 infantry, 3 cavalry and 3 artillery regiments and is in possession of 150 guns.

  • Army of Utrecht (Leger fan Utert)

      This army is the second largest, and ironically the newest Army in Frisia. It is 15,000 man strong, made of 15 regiments and its headquarters is in the Arsenal of Utrecht. Its formation is 9 infantry, 4 cavalry and 2 artillery regiments and is in possession of 100 guns. It usually spends time fighting on behalf of whichever side pays the most in European Conflicts.

  • Army of West Frisia (Leger fan West-Fryslân)

      While West Frisia possesses the most important Frisian harbors, their protection is primarily the duty of the navy. Regardless, it is the army that is expected to expand first should the Opstalboom support increasing Frisian land force strength. It is 6,000 man strong, made of 6 regiments and its headquarters is in Fort Stadjer near Amsterdam. Its formation is 4 infantry, 1 cavalry and 1 artillery regiments and it possesses 50 guns.

  • Army of East Frisia (Leger fan East-Fryslân)

      This army is the smallest of the four 'armies' of Frisia. It is 3,000 man strong, made of 3 regiments and its headquarters is in Emden, East Frisia. Its formation is 2 infantry and 1 cavalry regiments.

  • Hanseatic Garrison (Hânze Garnizoen)

      The only European garrison, it is charged with the protection of the province of North Frisia (Ditmarsh) and the recently-acquired province of Rugen. The separated nature of the two regions and their small size necessitate this lack of formal structure. In reality, this 'garrison' is only a formal name and not existing in practice. As such, this force, 3,000 man strong and made of 3 infantry regiments divided into the garrisons of 4 forts scattered in the two provinces.

  • West Indies Garrison (West-Ynje Garnizoen)

      The West Indies Garrison is 3,000 man strong and made of 3 infantry regiments raised fully from the area they belong to. A large portion of the personnel of this garrison are the native Carib people of the isles under Frisian control though Frisian and otherwise European soldiers of settler disposition also exist. The West Indies garrison is made of 3 infantry regiments and scattered in Frisian forts and settlements in the Caribbean and South America.

  • African Garrison (Afrikaanske garnizoen)

      The final of the three garrisons and also the smallest, the African Garrison is a 1,000 man strong army made of 1 regiment that is situated in the four forts under Frisian controls that are built along the Guinea Coast of West Africa.

Frisian Navy

Frisian Navy
Fryske Marine

Flag of the Frisian Navy

Active

8 January 1488

Country

Frisia

Role

Naval Warfare
Trade Protection
Privateering

Size

8,500 sailors
100 ships

Headquarters

Amsterdam, Frisia

Engagements

Great Peasant War (1488-1541)
First Narrow Sea War (1544-1545)
Second Narrow Sea War (1554-1555)
War of the League of Fulda (1572-1578)
First Caribbean War (1584-1588)
Danish-Scottish War (1587-1591)
Conquest of Rugen (1598)



Commander-in-Chief

Potestaat Klaes Auwerk

Deputy Commander

Prince-Admiral Theudoric Readehoed

The Frisian Navy (Frisian: Fryske Marine) is the naval force of the military of Frisia. Its origins date back to the period before even the Great Peasant War, but its 'founding date' is often considered to be 1488 when the fleets of five major cities of Emden, Ljouwert, Amsterdam, Roterdam and the Hague merged into the Frisian Fleet in the earlier stages of the Great Frisian War. It is now one of the largest in the world, and has served in four purely naval wars within the last 55 years, primarily against France, England, Scotland and Spain.

Its primary directive is protection of Frisian ships in naval trade routes where Frisia is the most active in, though pure naval warfare and privateering are also part of its mission. It is, like other branches of the Frisian military, under the supreme command of the potestaat, currently Klaes Auwerk.

History

Origins

Initially, the Frisian navy had a private character. Wealthy merchants and local authorities in the many ports of the Low Counties took initiative to arm ships since the 15th century and incidentally attacked pirates and foreign competitors. Defensive measures to protect the merchant ships could include sailing in a convoy and arming the merchants themselves. Offensive actions could include taking enemy ships by force. This was actively supported by authorities in times of war, who handed letters of marque, allowing captains to attack and, if possible capture enemy ships and their cargoes.

The central authorities' crusade to increase supervision of these private navies was a process that aligns with the centralization of Frisia under the Opstalboom in late 15th century. On 8 January 1488, the Frisian navy was formed under an agreement of the Opstalboom by uniting the fleets of Ljouwert, Emden, Amsterdam, Roterdam and the Hague. The role of the navy had a legal status from then on, and the task of defending the country at sea was the responsibility of the Admiral of Middle Frisia, later Prince-Admiral of Frisia, appointed by the potestaat.

During the Great Peasant War (1486-1541), a string of potestaats issued letters of marque. These roving bands of ships became known as the Sea Beggars. Throughout the war, the navy was slowly reorganized into a better command structure.

Narrow Sea Wars

The Frisian navy fought the English navy twice between 1544 and 1556 in what came to be known as the Narrow Sea Wars. The primary reason of these conflicts were discontent between the merchant classes of the two states and a violent competition over domination of the Narrow Sea trade node which both countries saw as their primary source of trade. In the first war only 2,500 soldiers were deployed on the two sides and less than 1,000 casualties (be it death, injury or capture) was suffered by all, while more than 63 ships and 15,000 sailors were killed in conflict. The second war, in particular Norton's Rampage in Flyland, saw a large use of infantry by the English (and their adversaries the French) but no only a small army of 7,500 was used by Frisia.

The Frisian Navy fought in major battles in the two wars such as the Battle of Amsterdam Harbor (19 December 1544) and the Battle of London (21-23 January 1545) in the First and the Battle of the Wills (18-23 February 1554), the Second Battle of the Straits (19-23 March 1556) and the Battle of London (17 July 1556) in the Second Narrow Sea Wars. The first flagship of the Frisian navy saw its only engagement in the first of the two Narrow Sea wars and was sunk in the Battle of London (1st NSW) while the second flagship (in use as Flagship until 1578, still used by the Navy as a ship of the line) was captured in the first war and saw extensive use in the second. It was the two Narrow Sea Wars that brought forth the earlier stages of Frisian naval tradition, as well as the habit of using hybrid light ships of military grade for merchantry.

War of the League of Fulda

While not the primary branch in the War of the League of Fulda (also known as the Franco-Frisian War), the Frisian navy was of absolute importance. The Frisian tactical victory in the Battle of Solebay (June 7 1572) essentially established Frisian naval supremacy in the Narrow Sea, forcing the smaller English and French fleets to their ports. This naval supremacy was of vital importance during the Battle of Holland (24 July 1572 - 11 April 1576), and was challenged by the Anglo-French hosts for multiple times. The most important of these battles was the Battle of Texel (1573) which forced the English to negotiate a separate peace in the war.

After 1573, Frisian fleets regularly raided French ports in retaliation for the atrocities previously committed on Frisian soil, eventually leading to the Battle of Ouistreham (15-19 August 1575) which directly allowed the Frisian ships to sail into the Seine and raid French settlements farther from the harbor. Just as the Narrow Sea Wars forced England to accept Frisian domination in the zone, the French naval capacity was similarly reduced in the War of the League of Fulda, leaving Frisia the primary trading power in the zone that it shares with them.

Current Engagements

After the Franco-Frisian War, Frisia participated in two major wars in a mostly naval capacity. The First Caribbean War, fought by Frisia and an alliance of England, Denmark and France against Spain over colonies in the Caribbean Sea was a mostly naval engagement that in essence gave Frisia a foothold in the Caribbean Sea. Frisian ships fought the Spaniards regularly in the Caribbeans, while it fought, alongside its allies, in the Battles of Brest and Bermeo in European waters. The most important battle of this war was Prince-Admiral Filt's Battle (17-23 March 1588) between Spain and the Frisian fleet under the man who became the namesake of the battle. Frisia lost 18 ships in this battle, including two of its Heavy Ships of the Line, but captured 19, including San Cristobal, the 60-gun Flagship of the Spanish Fleet, which currently serves in the West Indies Fleet of the Frisian navy.

Late into the First Caribbean War, Frisia -and its ally in Denmark- went to war with another country. Denmark and Scotland had already been at war over domination of the Danish-Scottish War -in particular the matter of Orkney which had been a point of dispute between Scotland and Denmark. Frisia fought on Denmark's side during this war, beginning in the Battle of Orkney (17 June 1587), in which it was defeated by the Scottish fleet, allowing the Scottish Army to march into Orkney and capture it. When the Carribean War ended, Frisia once again challenged the Scottish navy, defeating them in the Battle of the Tyne (19-21 August 1589) and both cutting off the Army of Orkney from the mainland and putting much of the Eastern Scottish coast under a blockade. Scotland surrendered after 2 years under the blockade returning Shetland and Orkney to Danish control in the treaty of Edinburgh (18 January 1591).

The Frisian navy recently concluded a long campaign against the pirates of Rugen in a battle in the Sound and helped capture the isle of Rugen in June 1598. Its primary directive right now is protection of trade in the Caribbean Sea, the Guinea Sea, the Narrow Sea, the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, though a small contingent of light explorer ships have begun exploring the Cape of Good Hope and what lies in the East in search of better trade.

Organization

The Frisian navy is divided into seven formations, each with a distinct form of duty and directive. Frisian ships are generally divided into "Heavy Ship" (also Ship of the Line), "Light Ship" (also Frigate), "Galley" and "Transport Ship". Frisia has a total of 100 ships in possession, which are divided into the following formations:

    Fleet of the Narrow Sea (Float fan 'e Nausee)
    • The Narrow Sea Fleet, also called the Home Fleet or the Grand Fleet, is the largest formation of the Frisian Navy and also the oldest. It is a purely military fleet with no capacity for trade protection or privateering missions, and is primarily stationed unless at times of war. The Narrow Sea Fleet has its headquarters in Amsterdam. Its command ship is Prins-Admiraal de Filt, which also happens to be the third and current Flagship of the Frisian Navy. It is made of 10 heavy ships, 16 galleys and 10 transport ships, making a total of 943 guns on 36 ships, 4,100 crew and potentially 10,000 soldiers.

  • Grey Fleet (Grize Float)

      The Grey Fleet is the light ship counterpart of the Narrow Sea Fleet. It is primed with trade protection and anti-pirate action in the Narrow Sea, and as such permanently on duty. Its headquarters is in The Hague, while its command ship is Noard-Hollân, a Frigate with 15 guns. It is made of 15 light ships, making a total of 225 guns and 750 crew on 15 ships.

  • Fleet of the North Sea (Float fan 'e Noardsee)

      The Fleet of the North Sea is tasked with trade protection in the North Sea as well as transport troops between North Frisia, Rugen and the contiguous provinces. Its headquarters is in Husum, North Frisia while its command ship is the Galleon Potestaat Roosveld. It is made of 1 heavy ship (the aforementioned galleon), 10 light ships and 4 transport ships, making a total of 239 guns on 15 ships, 900 crew and potentially 4,000 soldiers.

  • Fleet of the Baltic Sea (Float fan 'e Eastsee)

      The Baltic Fleet is the second purely trade-based fleet in Frisia, Stationed in Rugen, it is tasked with protection of trade in the Baltic Sea and the Hanseatic Trade node, in particular the Sound. Its command ship is the frigate Rugen, which is also the most recent ship in the navy. It is made of 5 light ships, making 75 guns and 250 crew in 5 ships.

  • West Indies Fleet (West-Ynje Float)

      The primary overseas fleet of the Frisian navy, the West Indies Fleet is tasked with protection of Frisian waters in the West Indies, transporting soldiers between Frisian colonies in the West Indies, protection of trade in the Caribbean and Amazon trade nodes and anti-pirate action in the same. Its headquarters is New Polweerm in the colony of New Heligoland, while its command ship is the captured Spanish Carrack San Cristobal. It is made of 3 heavy ships, 5 light ships, 7 galleys and 4 transport ships, making a total of 400 guns on 19 ships, 1,750 crew and potentially 4,000 soldiers.

  • Guinea Fleet (Guinea float)

      The Guinea Fleet is the smallest stationed fleet in Frisian navy. It is tasked with the protection of Frisian waters in the African coast, transporting soldiers between Frisian forts and settlements in West Africa, protection of trade in the Guinea Coast trade node and fighting piracy in the same. Its headquarters is in Fort Frijheid in Gabu while its command ship is the captured Scottish Carrack Great Michael. It is made of 1 heavy ship (the aforementioned carrack), 2 light ships, 2 galleys and 2 transport ships, making a total of 128 guns on 7 ships, 600 crew and potentially 2,000 soldiers.

  • Exploration Squadron (Ferkenning Eskander)

      The Exploration Squadron is an elite squadron of 3 exploration ships tasked with exploring South Africa, Cape of Good Hope and what lies beyond in hopes of future colonization or trade. It has no headquarters but its command ship is Nij Helgolân, coincidentally the first ship built in the shipyard of New Heligoland from which it takes its name. It is made of 3 light ships, making a crew of 150 and a total of 45 guns.

Inventory

Heavy Ships

Heavy ships, also called Ships of the Line, are the primary ships in the Frisian lines of battle. Large, capable of holding three to four times more guns than other forms of ship, they are expensive, hard to maintain and an absolute necessity in the principle of Fleet in Being. Prior to 1596, Frisia only had access to Carracks, but following recent discoveries in naval technology, the Galleon, a large three-masted ship with 60 guns on a single deck is slowly replacing the Carrack.

Frisia has a total of 15 Heavy Ships, 5 of them galleons though the other 10 are expected to be upgraded and retrofitted within the next 10-25 months. The Flagship of the Frisian Navy, Prins-Admiraal de Filt is a Galleon. It is conventional to name Galleons after important people, battles or concepts in the Frisian navy. The full list of Frisian heavy ships currently in use is as followed:

  • Prins-Admiraal de Filt. Galleon, 90 guns. Flagship of the Frisian Navy and command ship of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1597

  • Potestaat Dykstra. Galleon, 60 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1596.

  • Grutte Fryslân. Galleon, 60 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1596

  • Grutte Keapman. Galleon, 60 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1597

  • Slach om 'e wil. Galleon, 60 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 3rd ship of the same name. Built in 1596

  • Sovereign. Carrack, 65 guns. Former Flagship of the English navy, part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1544, captured in 1556

  • Slach by Warns. Carrack, 50 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 4th ship of the same name. Built in 1585

  • Lyts Hollân. Carrack, 50 guns. Formerly part of the English Navy as the Resolute, part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1540, captured in 1544

  • Maurits Sibets. Carrack, 50 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 2nd ship of the same name. Built in 1564

  • Trije Dagen. Carrack, 50 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 4th ship of the same name. Built in 1570

  • Potestaat Roosveld. Galleon, 60 guns. Command ship of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1596

  • San Cristobal. Carrack, 75 guns. Former Flagship of Spain, command ship of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1545, captured in 1588

  • El Vencedor. Carrack, 50 guns. Formerly part of the Spanish Navy as the Real Felipe El Vencedor, part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1582, captured in 1586

  • Biskop fan Ljouwert. Carrack, 50 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet, 3rd ship of the same name. Built in 1559

  • Great Michael. Carrack, 50 guns. Former Flagship of Scotland, command ship of the Guinea Fleet. Built in 1563, captured in 1589

Light Ships

Light Ships, also called Frigates, are the primary ships for the intention of trade protection. Fast, well-armed and with light but durable hull, they are cheap to build and to maintain. The go-to light ship for Frisia is the Frigate, which replaced the earlier Cavarels in 1596-98. Frigates are small ships with a single deck capable of escorting a ship, defending it against pirates and boarding enemy ships.

Frisia has a total of 40 Light ships, all of them Frigates. It is conventional to name Frigates after provinces, regions or major cities. The full list of Frisian Light Ships currently in use is as followed:

  • Noard-Hollân. Frigate, 15 guns. Command ship of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1560, upgraded in 1598

  • Auwerk. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1541, upgraded in 1598

  • Grins. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Grey Fleet, 2nd ship of the same name. Built in 1598

  • East-Fryslân. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Grey Fleet, 6th ship of the same name. Built in 1598

  • Harns. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Grey Fleet, 3rd ship of the same name. Built in 1598

  • Holwert. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1596

  • De Lemmer. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1596

  • Lier. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1566, upgraded in 1597

  • Hoarn. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1543, upgraded in 1597

  • 's-Gravenhage. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1546, upgraded in 1597

  • Fleur de Lys. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the French Navy, part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1558, captured in 1574, upgraded in 1597

  • Aventurier . Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the French Navy, part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1563, captured in 1576, upgraded in 1597

  • Sainte Anne. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the French Navy, part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1568, captured in 1576, upgraded in 1597

  • Merlin. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the English Navy, part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1540, captured in 1556, upgraded in 1597

  • Falcon. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the English Navy, part of the Grey Fleet. Built in 1564, captured in 1573, upgraded in 1597

  • Iemshaven. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the North Sea Fleet, 2nd ship of the same name. Built in 1597

  • Emden. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the North Sea Fleet, 4th ship of the same name. Built in 1597

  • Norden. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the North Sea Fleet, 3rd ship of the same name. Built in 1597

  • Esens. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1597

  • Delfsyl. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1597

  • Berrege. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the Brabantine Fleet, part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1563, captured in 1574, upgraded in 1596

  • Andorf. Frigate, 20 guns. Former flagship of the Brabantine Navy, part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1571, captured in 1576, upgraded in 1596

  • Seelân. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the Brabantine Fleet as Zeeland, part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1566, captured in 1576, upgraded in 1596

  • Eastende. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the Flemish Fleet as Ostende, part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1560, captured in 1574, upgraded in 1597

  • Hertog van Vlaanderen. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the Flemish Fleet, part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1560, captured in 1574, upgraded in 1597

  • Rugen. Frigate, 15 guns. Command ship of the Baltic Sea Fleet. Built in 1598

  • Hüsem. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Baltic Sea Fleet. Built in 1598

  • Bräist. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Baltic Sea Fleet. Built in 1598

  • Heide. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Baltic Sea Fleet. Built in 1580, upgraded in 1596

  • Swol. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the Utrechtian Navy as Zwolle, part of the Baltic Sea Fleet. Built in 1523, captured in 1576, upgraded in 1596

  • Utert. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet, 3rd ship of the same name. Built in 1589, upgraded in 1597.

  • El Dorado. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the Spanish Navy, part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1570, captured in 1585, upgraded in 1596

  • El Vengativo. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the Spanish Navy as Dios el vengativo, part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1573, captured in 1586, upgraded in 1597

  • Nij Polweerm. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1596

  • Noard-Fryslân. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1581, upgraded in 1596

  • Kaap Ivoor. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Guinea Fleet. Built in 1560, upgraded in 1596

  • Invincible. Frigate, 15 guns. Formerly part of the English Navy, part of the Guinea Fleet. Built in 1542, captured in 1554, upgraded in 1596

  • Nij Helgolân. Frigate, 15 guns. Command Ship of the Exploration Squadron. Built in 1598

  • Nij Ljouwert. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Exploration Squadron. Built in 1598

  • Frisoland. Frigate, 15 guns. Part of the Exploration Squadron. Built in 1598

Galleys
Unlike Heavy and Light Ships, Galleys use both oars and sail to move. To this end, they're significantly smaller than both ships but remain somewhere between the two in terms of guns. They are primarily used for moving in inland seas and navigation in rivers. Outside of Frisia, they're mostly used for navigation in the Mediterranean Sea and to a lesser degree the Baltic Sea.

Frisia has a total of 25 Galleys, all of them being classified as Galleas. It is conventional to name Galleys after bodies of water such as rivers, lakes or seas. The full list of Frisian Galleys currently in use is as followed:

  • Nausee. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 3rd ship of the same name. Built in 1593

  • Iems. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1593

  • Weser. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1593

  • Ryn. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1593

  • Elbe. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1593

  • Skelde. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1593

  • Amstel. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1588

  • Fecht yn Utert. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1588

  • Isel. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 3rd ship of the same name. Built in 1588

  • Waal. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 2nd ship of the same name. Built in 1588

  • Jadeboezem. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1588

  • Trave. Galleas, 18 guns. Formerly part of the Hanseatic Navy, part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1580, sold to Frisia in 1588

  • Belterwijde. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1584

  • Sudersee. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1584

  • Kust fan Hollân. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1584 Built in 1584

  • La Seine. Galleas, 18 guns. Formerly part of the French Navy, part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1551, upgraded in 1583

  • kanaal fan 'e Prins. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1591

  • Draak 'e Mûle. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1591

  • Nariva. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1591

  • Farske fan 'e Prins. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1591

  • Maracaibo. Galleas, 18 guns. Formerly part of the Spanish Fleet, part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1583, captured in 1587

  • Prins. Galleas, 18 guns. Formerly part of the Spanish Fleet as Príncipe de los mares, part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1578, captured in 1583, upgraded in 1588

  • Velas de blanca. Galleas, 18 guns. Formerly part of the Spanish Fleet, part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1583, captured in 1587

  • Zannaga. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Guinea Fleet. Built in 1590

  • Krús. Galleas, 18 guns. Part of the Guinea Fleet. Built in 1590

Transport Ships

Transport Ships are lower-class warships designed primarily to transport cargo or passengers across the sea. While they are used by merchants to transport cargo between Frisian colonies, the Frisian navy uses an armada of transport ships for the purpose of transporting troops. The Frisian fleet uses ships called Fluyts for transporting regiments.

Frisia has no specific convention for naming Transport Ships, and uses a total of 16 in its fleets, while the other 4 are Brigs taken from other fleets. The full list of Transport Ships currently in use by the Frisian Navy is as followed:

  • Gouden Frijheid. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1590

  • Stoarmfeart. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1590

  • Hoarn fan Nederlân. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1590

  • Aartsengel Mikkel. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1590

  • Wraak. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1590

  • Seeman-Kening. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1585

  • Hear-Prins Friso. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 2nd ship of the same name. Built in 1585

  • Marije fan Boergonje. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 3rd ship of the same name. Built in 1585

  • Himmel. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet. Built in 1585

  • Noardsee. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the Narrow Sea Fleet, 5th ship of the same name. Built in 1585

  • Edelweiß. Brig, 6 guns. Formerly part of the Hanseatic Navy, part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1578, sold to Frisia in 1595

  • Dame der sieben Meere. Brig, 6 guns. Formerly part of the Hanseatic Navy, part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1578, sold to Frisia in 1595

  • Fange. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1584

  • Frede. Fluyt. 6 guns. Part of the North Sea Fleet. Built in 1584

  • Grutte Batavia. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1595

  • Upstalbeam. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet, 3rd ship of the same name. Built in 1595

  • Mem fan God. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1590

  • Aartsengel Gabriel. Fluyt, 6 guns. Part of the West Indies Fleet. Built in 1590

  • Invictus. Brig, 6 guns. Formerly part of the Utrechtian Navy, part of the Guinea Fleet. Built in 1570, captured in 1576

  • Prins-Biskop. Brig, 6 guns. Formerly part of the Utrechtian Navy, part of the Guinea Fleet. Built in 1570, captured in 1576

Frisian Marines

Frisian Marine Corps
Fryske Marinierskorps

Banner of the Korps Mariniers

Active

11 June 1551

Country

Frisia

Role

Expeditionary Warfare
Amphibious Warfare

Size

5,000
5 transport ships
30 guns

Headquarters

Emden, Frisia

Engagements

Second Narrow Sea War (1554-1555)
War of the League of Fulda (1572-1578)
First Caribbean War (1584-1588)
Conquest of Rugen (1598)



Commander-in-Chief

Potestaat Klaes Auwerk

Deputy Commander

General Elrich von Emden

The Frisian Marine Corps (Frisian: Fryske Marinierskorps), also called the Korps Mariniers, is an elite infantry component of the Frisian military. It is specialized in special operations, highly extreme conditions and primarily amphibious warfare. A rapid reaction force, they primarily serve in amphibious operations against fortified coastal positions. While similar units exist outside of Frisia, in comparison with Spain, Portugal and England, Frisian marines have the largest percentage in comparison to their total infantry force (10%), though the Spanish Marine component is larger in numbers. Since its creation during the second Narrow Sea War, it has fought in four military campaigns.

History


Second Battle of London
The Marine component was founded on 11 June 1551 during the Second Narrow Sea War by the Potestaat of Frisia, Durk Stadjer and Admiral Friso de Filt. Its first leader was former privateer Willem fan Auwerk. The Frisians had successfully used ordinary soldiers in ships at sea in the First Narrow Sea War. It was the fifth Marine unit formed, being preceded by Spain's Infantería de Armada, the Portuguese Marine Corps, France's Troupes de marine and the English Royal Marines but the first corps in history to be specialised in amphibious operations.

In 1556, led by de Filt, at that time an admiral, the Marinerezjimint played a prominent part in the large Frisian attack on London, leading to the burning of 60% of the city and 63% of the English Navy. The Korps' battle honour "London" is one of the few that was won on English soil by a European power.

The Marines also fought in the War of the League of Fulda. Their major involvements include the Battles of Solebay, Texel and Ouistreham, while the battle honour "Seine" refers to the long raiding campaign in the Seine that was only stopped in Paris itself. Later they served in the only land battles fought by Frisia in the First Caribbean War, including the Santiago campaign which resulted in the capture of Santiago (now named Frisoland after the first leader of the Marines.

After the Caribbean War, the marines were increased from 2 regiments to 5 as of 1598, at which point they laid an attack on the island of Rugen.

Structure

The Frisian Marine Corps structure is as followed:

  • Marine Corps Command Staff

  • 1st Marine Regiment Middle Frisia

  • 2nd Marine Regiment Middle Frisia

  • 1st Marine Regiment West Frisia

  • 1st Marine Regiment Utrecht

  • 1st Marine Regiment North Frisia

The Corps is commanded by a General, currently Elrich von Emden, while supreme command of the corps is under the Potestaat. Each regiment, total personnel 1,000, is commanded by a Marshal and his command staff. Each regiment is divided into five companies of 200 each commanded by a major.

The Marine Corps has five fluyt-class transport ships for purposes of transportation and naval support, each with six cannons that can be removed from the ship for mission purposes.

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